Thursday, October 19, 2017

The Old Gods of England

James Lloyd visits a long barrow in Oxfordshire and tells the tale of the ancient Anglo-Saxon god of manufacturing, just one of the many examples of how myths, legends and folktales can become attached...

Two Brothers, a County and a Horse

A native-born Man of Kent looks at the history of his county’s flag and discovers that its origin is a little less romantic than he at first believed. In 449, or so tradition has it,...

Mapped: England’s least-visited attractions

Museums are wonderful things, not least because of the amount of time and effort people - usually volunteers - put into creating them. Last year, the Telegraph published an article on England's 15 least-visited...

Elderly people are struggling to heat their park homes this winter

Alice Woudhuysen, Senior Campaigns Manager at Age UK, outlines the struggle many elderly people face in trying to heat their park homes. Living in a park home – a static mobile home – is a popular...

Flood damage: how Age UK is helping those who have lost everything

Caroline Abrahams, Charity Director of Age UK, outlines the effect recent flooding has had on the elderly community, and what the charity is doing to help. It was shocking and saddening to see the...

The Infamous Afterlife of Bloody John Baker: Part Two

James Lloyd examines how a common English folktale was re-invented by the people of a Kentish town into a satire on a particularly hated local politician. Panto season is upon us and up and down...

The Infamous Afterlife of Bloody John Baker

James Lloyd examines Kentish folklore surrounding one of England’s most unprincipled Chancellors of the Exchequer. Country folk are great haters. We hate everyone: City folk, headmasters, vicars (especially vicars). Generally these people are outsiders who, having...